Memorial service set for Beaufort County pilot

Funeral services have been set for the Beaufort County man who died in a plane crash last week.

Stephanie Saccio says her husband, Tom Saccio, died after his Seawind airplane, which he built himself, went down in Bloomington, Indiana on Thursday.

According to radio communications with the Monroe County airport, Saccio radioed the tower and reported a low fuel pressure indicator and asked permission to land. Six minutes later another plane in the area reported seeing black smoke and later the wreckage with no one in sight.

A memorial service for the Blounts Creek man will be held at the Turnage Theater in Washington on Saturday, October 4th. Services begin at 11 a-m.

Because Saccio grew up in Brooklyn, a second service will be held in New York the following weekend.

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The wife of a Beaufort County man says her husband died Thursday in an Indiana plane crash.

Stephanie Saccio says her husband, Tom Saccio, was killed in the crash that killed two people in Bloomington, Indiana airport.

"I asked her," says Stephanie. "I said, 'Do you think they suffered?' She said 'No, I think by the time they hit the ground they were dead. They were engulfed in flames, probably.' Sadly."

A friend of Saccio says the Blounts Creek man was flying his Seawind airplane that the man built himself. Saccio was on his way to a splash-in in Illinois for seaplanes like his, according to Chuck Boklage, a good friend and neighbor of Saccio's.

Saccio was instrumental in the Wright Flight Program for Beaufort County Schools.

"It may continue, but he is just the heart and soul of the Wright Flight Program for us," says Sherrie Swain, a colleague.

The friend of Saccio who was also killed in the crash was not from Eastern Carolina, Boklage said.

According to radio communications with the Monroe County Airport, Saccio radioed the tower and reported a low fuel pressure indicator and asked permission to land. The aircraft was less than eight miles north of the airport.

Six minutes later another plane in the area reported seeing black smoke and later the wreckage with no one in sight.

Because both bodies were burned, the coroner says they may have to rely on DNA and dental records for positive identification.

Saccio grew up in Brooklyn, New York and worked as a prop master on movie sets for 40 years.