UPDATE: Jury sentences man to death for 2016 murder of Morehead City woman

BEAUFORT, NC (WITN) - A Carteret County jury says that a man responsible for the murder of a Morehead City woman in 2016 should be put to death for the crime.

Godwin stood with his head down and appeared unmoved by the verdict.

Wendy Tamagne's mother and sister are now delivering victim impact statements to the court and jury.

The jury got the case this morning and deliberated just over two hours before returning the death penalty verdict.

There are currently 141 offenders on death row in North Carolina.


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It's a life or death decision today as a Carteret County jury decides whether a man is sent to death row or spends the rest of his life in prison.

Jurors began deliberating the sentence for David Godwin just before 10:15 this morning.

Prosecutors want the Newport man to receive the death penalty, while Godwin's lawyers hope jurors will spare his life, saying he suffers from mental health issues.

It took the same jurors just 90 minutes to find Godwin guilty eleven days ago on all counts in the July 4, 2016 killing of Wendy Tamagne.

The woman's body was found in trash bags inside her Morehead City apartment.


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A Carteret County jury will return to the courtroom Monday where they are expected to start deciding whether a Newport man should be placed on death row.

David Godwin was found guilty last Friday on all counts in the July 4, 2016 killing of Wendy Tamagne.

The woman's body was found in trash bags inside her apartment.

Prosecutors are asking for the death penalty, but Godwin's attorney wants the man's life spared saying he suffers from mental health issues.

The defense finished with their witnesses Thursday afternoon.

Because Friday is a state holiday, jurors were told to come back Monday morning when they will hear closing arguments and instructions from the judge before deliberating life or death.


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The sentencing for a man convicted in the gruesome murder of a Morehead City woman resumed this morning after a courthouse power outage on Tuesday.

David Godwin was found guilty late Friday afternoon on all counts in the July 4, 2016 killing of Wendy Tamagne.

The woman's body was found in trash bags inside her apartment.

Prosecutors are asking for the death penalty, but the sentencing was abruptly halted yesterday when a vehicle backed into a power transformer, cutting off power to the entire courthouse complex.

Godwin told the judge on Tuesday that he would not be taking to stand during his sentencing.

Defense lawyers say they plan to call six witnesses today as part of mitigating evidence before jurors decide whether Godwin should get the death penalty.

Among witnesses today was the man's second grade teacher at Newport Elementary School. He recalled that Godwin was an inquisitive student, always asking questions and wanting to know "why" to directions on assignments.

A mental health worker also told jurors that she knew Godwin from a young age, but often had to reprimand him for playing too rough her kids, adding that he often seemed irritable and depressed.


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A man facing the death penalty told the judge he will not take the witness stand during his sentencing.

David Godwin was found guilty late Friday afternoon on all counts in the gruesome murder of a Morehead City woman.

Godwin has been standing trial for the July 4, 2016 killing of 37-year-old Wendy Tamagne. The woman's body was found in trash bags inside her apartment.

During the first phase of the trial, Godwin also elected not to testify.

Prosecutors told the jury that all of the aggravating factors that they have to consider for the death penalty were presented during the guilty & innocence phase of the trial so they won't be presenting any more direct testimony.

The defense began calling witnesses this morning, the first a prisons and criminal justice consultant. They are also expected to call several family members and friends of Godwin.

The sentencing was delayed Tuesday afternoon when a vehicle backed into a power transformer, knocking out power to the courthouse.

It will continue Wednesday morning.


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A Carteret County jury has found David Godwin guilty of first degree murder in the gruesome death of a Morehead City woman.

Jurors deliberated about 90 minutes this afternoon.

Godwin has been standing trial for the July 4, 2016 killing of 37-year-old Wendy Tamagne.

The woman's body was found in trash bags inside her Morehead City apartment.

The Newport man was found guilty on all counts. Those included first degree murder with malice, premeditation, and deliberation; first degree felony murder by means of robbery with a dangerous weapon; first degree felony murder by means of common law robbery; first degree felony murder by means of felonious dismemberment or destroying of human remains; and first degree murder by lying in wait.

Prosecutors will now ask the same jury to give Godwin the death penalty.

The man's lawyers said the case was not about who killed the woman, but why. Several of their witnesses testified that Godwin suffered from mental health issues.


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A man accused of killing a Morehead City woman and then putting her body parts in trash bags did not take the witness stand in his capital murder trial.

Today was the eighth and final day of testimony in the David Godwin trial in Beaufort.

As his defense team wrapped up their case, Godwin told the judge he would not be testifying and that was solely his decision.

Godwin could receive the death penalty if convicted in the July 4th, 2016 murder of Wendy Tamagne.

The man's lawyers said the case was not about who killed the woman, but why. Several of their witnesses testified that Godwin suffered from mental health issues.

The last witness was a Boston College professor, who interviewed Godwin for ten hours over two visits, as well as his family.

Dr. Ann Burgess told jurors that in her expert opinion when the murder happened Godwin didn't have the mental capacity to form the specific intent to kill.

Jurors in the case will hear closing arguments before they start deliberating guilt or innocence.