Advertisement

Parents’ rights bill clears state Senate Healthcare Committee

(WITN)
Published: May. 26, 2022 at 5:22 PM EDT
Email This Link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

RALEIGH, N.C. (WITN) - A piece of legislation critics are calling North Carolina’s version of a “Don’t Say Gay” bill has cleared another state senate committee.

Advocacy group Equality North Carolina says House Bill 755, also called Parents’ Bill of Rights, has passed through the Senate Healthcare Committee.

The announcement comes one day after Senate Republicans announced the legislation had moved out of the Senate Education Committee along party lines.

The legislation unveiled Tuesday would bar public school curriculum for kindergarten through third grade from containing instruction on sexual orientation and gender identity.

In a statement released Thursday, Equality NC Executive Director Kendra Johnson expressed outrage over the proposed bill.

“We are outraged that this bill continues to progress through the General Assembly. We are disappointed in the NC GOP’s lack of transparency, and fast-tracking of such a harmful piece of legislation,” Johnson said. “House Bill 755 is an attack on LGBTQ+ youth, educators, and parents. We know that forced outing and erasure in the curriculum have severe impacts on queer and trans young people’s safety, mental health and well-being, especially poor youth and youth of color.”

On Wednesday, republicans defended the legislation, claiming it allowed parents to have a larger role in their child’s education.

“When schools shut down during the pandemic, a lot of parents were able to see their child’s education firsthand,” State Senator Deanna Ballard said. “This bill empowers parents to play an active and present role in their child’s schooling. Parents are their child’s best advocates.”

According to republicans, the bill also requires that parents will be notified if their child wishes to use different pronouns in school and allows for parents to request and review classroom material being used.

It would have to pass both chambers before heading to Democratic Gov. Roy Cooper’s desk.

Copyright 2022 WITN. All rights reserved.