UNC Marine Sciences professor: Climate change could cause more severe weather patterns

UNC Marine Sciences professor: Climate change could cause more severe weather patterns
Updated: Jun. 16, 2021 at 7:09 PM EDT
Email This Link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

GREENVILLE, N.C. (WITN) - Weather and marine experts believe the continued human-induced climate change will cause longer droughts and more hurricane and tropical storm landfall.

The pandemic caused a significant decrease in fossil fuel emissions, but with a gradual return to normalcy, experts are concerned that the resurgence in global temperatures will cause sea levels to continue to rise and for water quality to continue to suffer.

When asked about types of algae that thrive in warmer conditions, Hans Paerl, a professor from the University of North Carolina Institute of Marine Sciences said, “We call them harmful algae. They produce chemicals that are toxic to everything from the plankton that eat the algae, to fish and even humans. They can produce toxins which would put the waters off limits for example; for fishing recreational use, drinking water supplies.”

Tom Rickenbach, an atmospheric professor at East Carolina University explained the concerns related to storms and hurricanes and climate change saying, “It turns out that climate has a lot to do with water quality in our state. They produce chemicals that are toxic to everything from the plankton that eat the algae, to fish and even humans.”

Rickenbach went on to explain how areas like the southern Outer Banks are more at risk because of soil erosion, saying that higher water levels and more rainfall in these regions may cause landowners to have to come up with strategies to preserve the sand at nearby beaches.

According to climate central, seal levels have risen over 8 inches in the last century, and are trending to double by 2030.

Copyright 2021 WITN. All rights reserved.