FBI Releases Photos Of Two Suspects In Boston Marathon Bombing

The FBI has released photos of two suspects in the Boston Marathon bombings and is asking for the public's help in identifying them.

The FBI labeled them as Suspect 1 and Suspect 2. The FBI showed a photo in which the suspects were walking together.

Officials say Suspect 2 set down a backpack at the site of the second location. Both should be considered armed and extremely dangerous, according to the FBI.

The FBI urges the public to help them track down the suspects. A phone number for the public to call is 1-800-CALL-FBI. Within moments of the FBI releasing the images online, the agency's web site crashed.

The explosions Monday killed three people and injured more than 180. The FBI says the two planted the bombs within minutes of the blasts.

The images were released hours after President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama attended an interfaith service at a Roman Catholic cathedral in Boston to remember the victims, including an 8-year-old boy.


Press Conference:

The FBI and other law enforcement officials are planning a news briefing Thursday afternoon on the investigation into the Boston Marathon bombings.

The briefing will be held in just a few moments at the Sheraton Boston Hotel.

FBI agent Richard DesLauriers, U.S. Attorney Carmen Ortiz and other law enforcement officials are expected to update the media on the investigation.

The briefing is one of a series held since Monday's attacks.

Three people were killed and dozens injured Monday in two explosions near the finish line.

(Copyright 2013 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


Previous Story

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano says the FBI wants to speak with two men seen in at least one video from the Boston Marathon, but she says she isn't calling them suspects.

Without providing details of the men's appearance or what the video shows, Napolitano told the House Homeland Security Committee on Thursday that "there is some video that raised the question" of two men the FBI would like to interview but said she wouldn't described them as suspects.

Napolitano said it's still unclear whether the bombs that exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon were the work of foreign or domestic terrorists. She said the investigation is continuing "apace."

Three people were killed and more than 170 others were injured when the bombs exploded Monday.

(Copyright 2013 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


Previous Story

Media reports indicated there was an arrest in the Boston Marathon bombing, but that is not the case according to law enforcement officials.

An official spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity Wednesday, saying a suspect was in custody. CNN also reported an arrest. However, reports as of 2:32 p.m. indicate no arrest has been made.

An official said after an arrest the suspect would be taken to a Boston courthouse.

Law enforcement agencies had earlier pleaded for the public to come forward with photos, videos or any information that might help them solve the twin bombings that killed three people and wounded more than 170 on Monday.

Investigators circulated information about the bombs, which involved kitchen pressure cookers packed with explosives, nails and other lethal shrapnel. But the FBI said nobody had claimed responsibility.

(Copyright 2013 by WITN & The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


Previous Story

The third person killed in the Boston Marathon bombing is identified as a Chinese grad student who attended Boston University.

A state-run Chinese newspaper says on its official Twitter-like microblog that she was a student named Lingzi Lu. Lu's father confirms her death.

The other two victims already were identified ad 8-year-old Martin Richard of Boston and 29-year-old Krystle Campbell of Medford, Massachusetts.

A 29-year-old restaurant manager has been identified as one of three people killed in the bombing at the Boston Marathon.

Campbell's father says she had gone with her best friend to take a picture of the friend's boyfriend crossing the finish line on Monday afternoon.

William Campbell says his daughter, who managed a restaurant in nearby Arlington, was "very caring, very loving person, and was daddy's little girl." He says the loss has devastated the family.

He says the friend was seriously injured in the explosion.

8-year-old Martin Richard was at the finish line watching the race with his family.

Meanwhile, the FBI is confirming that pressure cookers may have been used in bombings.

FBI special agent in charge Richard DesLauriers spoke at a news conference Tuesday. He says pieces of black nylon and fragments of ball bearings and nails were found and authorities believe the bombs were placed in a dark-colored backpack or bag.

A source close to the investigation had said earlier that the bombs were made in 1.6-gallon pressure cookers, one containing shards of metal and ball bearings, the other packed with nails, and both stuffed into duffel bags.

A second person briefed on the investigation confirms that at least one of the explosives was made of a pressure cooker. Both spoke on condition of anonymity because the investigation is ongoing.


Previous Story

A person briefed on the Boston Marathon investigation says the explosives were in 6-liter pressure cookers and placed in black duffel bags.

The person says the explosives were placed on the ground and contained shards of metal, nails and ball bearings. The person spoke on the condition of anonymity because the investigation was ongoing.

The person says law enforcement officials have some of the bomb components but did not yet know what was used to set off the explosives.

President Barack Obama said Tuesday the bombings were an act of terrorism but investigators do not know if they were carried out by an international or domestic organization, or perhaps by a "malevolent individual."

(Copyright 2013 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


Previous Story

President Barack Obama says the explosions at the Boston Marathon are being investigated as an act of terror, although authorities still don't know who is responsible.

He called the bombing "a heinous and cowardly act" used to target innocent civilians.

Obama spoke to reporters at the White House after a briefing by his national security team.

Three people were killed, including an 8-year-old boy, and more than 170 were wounded in Monday's bombing at the famous marathon's finish line.

(Copyright 2013 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


Previous Story

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick says no unexploded bombs were found at the Boston Marathon. He says the only explosives were the ones that went off Monday.

Three people were killed, including an 8-year-old boy, and more than 150 injured by two explosions just seconds apart near the finish line.

Special Agent in Charge Richard DesLauriers says there are no known additional threats and agents are following a number of leads.

Police commissioner Ed Davis says it is the most complex crime scene in history of the department.

Authorities are looking for amateur video and photographic evidence that can give clues to who set off the bombs.

(Copyright 2013 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


Previous Story

An 8-year-old boy who was at the marathon to watch his father race was killed in the Monday explosion that rocked the Boston Marathon.

WHDH in Boston reports Martin Richard of Dorchester, Massachusetts was the third victim in the deadly explosion. The NBC affiliate said the boy's mother and sister were also injured: his mother had a brain injury and 6-year-old sister lost her leg.

Overnight, WBZ-TV reported that police obtained a search warrant for an apartment in Revere. Massachusetts State Police provided no further details.

The FBI is leading the investigation into the explosions, which killed three people and injured more than 140 others.

Authorities have not addressed a motive for the blasts or named who may have carried out the bombings.

Police say they have no suspects in custody.

Officials in Washington say there has been no immediate claim of responsibility, but the attack is being treated as an act of terrorism.


Previous Story:

A television station is reporting that police are searching an apartment in a Boston suburb, and authorities confirm the search is part of the investigation into the explosions near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

WBZ-TV reports that police are searching the apartment in Revere. Massachusetts State Police confirmed that a search warrant was served Monday night but provided no further details.

The FBI is leading the investigation into the explosions, which killed three people and injured more than 140 others. An 8-year-old boy was one of the three people killed Monday.

Authorities are shedding no light on a motive or who may have carried out the bombings, and police say they have no suspects in custody.

Officials in Washington say there has been no immediate claim of responsibility, but the attack is being treated as an act of terrorism.


Previous Story

Two bombs exploded in the packed streets near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Monday, killing three people and injuring more than 130 in a terrifying scene of shattered glass, bloodstained pavement and severed limbs, authorities said.

A senior U.S. intelligence official said two other bombs were found near the end of the 26.2-mile course.

President Barack Obama vowed that those responsible will "feel the full weight of justice."

A White House official speaking on condition of anonymity because the investigation was still unfolding said the attack was being treated as an act of terrorism.

Authorities shed no light on a motive or who may have carried out the attack, and police said they had no suspects in custody. Authorities in Washington said there was no immediate claim of responsibility.

"They just started bringing people in with no limbs," said runner Tim Davey, of Richmond, Va. He said he and his wife, Lisa, tried to keep their children's eyes shielded from the gruesome scene inside a medical tent that had been set up to care for fatigued runners, but "they saw a lot."

"They just kept filling up with more and more casualties," Lisa Davey said. "Most everybody was conscious. They were very dazed."

The fiery twin blasts took place almost simultaneously and about 100 yards apart, knocking spectators and at least one runner off their feet, shattering windows and sending dense plumes of smoke rising over the street and through the fluttering national flags lining the course.

When the second bomb went off, the spectators' cheers turned to screams. As sirens blared, emergency workers and National Guardsmen assigned to the race for crowd control began climbing over and tearing down temporary fences to get to the blast site.

A pool of blood formed, and huge shards were missing from window panes as high as three stories.

Boston police said two people were killed. Hospitals reported at least 105 injured, at least 15 of them critically.

Some 23,000 runners took part in the race, one of the world's oldest and most prestigious marathons. One of Boston's biggest annual events, the race winds up near Copley Square, not far from the landmark Prudential Center and the Boston Public Library. It is held on Patriots Day, which commemorates the first battles of the American Revolution, at Concord and Lexington in 1775.

Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis asked people to stay indoors or go back to their hotel rooms and avoid crowds as bomb squads methodically checked parcels and bags left along the race route. He said investigators didn't know precisely where the bombs were planted or whether they were hidden in mailboxes or trash cans.

He said authorities had received "no specific intelligence that anything was going to happen" at the race.

The Federal Aviation Administration barred low-flying aircraft from within 3.5 miles of the site.

Obama was briefed on the explosions by Homeland Security adviser Lisa Monaco. Obama also told Mayor Tom Menino and Gov. Deval Patrick that his administration would provide whatever support was needed, the White House said.

"We still don't know who did this or why," Obama said, adding, "Make no mistake: We will get to the bottom of this."

A few miles away from the finish line and around the same time, a fire broke out at the John F. Kennedy Library. The police commissioner said it may have been caused by an incendiary device but didn't appear to be related to the bombings.

The first loud explosion occurred on the north side of Boylston Street, just before the photo bridge that marks the finish line. The second explosion could be heard a few seconds later.

They occurred about four hours into the race and two hours after the men's winner crossed the line. By that point, more than 17,000 of the runners had finished the race, but thousands of others were farther back along the course.

The four-hour mark is typically a highly crowded time near the finish line - both because of the slow-but-steady recreational runners likely to be completing the race and because of all the relatives and friends clustered around to cheer them on.

Runners in the medical tent for treatment of dehydration or other race-related ills were pushed out to make room for victims of the bombing.

A senior U.S. intelligence official said the two other explosive devices found nearby were being dismantled. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the findings publicly.

A woman who was a few feet from the second bomb, Brighid Wall, 35, of Duxbury, said that when it exploded, runners and spectators froze, unsure of what to do. Her husband threw their children to the ground, lay on top of them and another man lay on top of them and said, "Don't get up, don't get up."

After a minute or so without another explosion, Wall said, she and her family headed to a Starbucks and out the back door through an alley. Around them, the windows off the bars and restaurants were blown out.

She said she saw six to eight people bleeding profusely, including one man who was kneeling, dazed, with blood coming down his head. Another person was on the ground covered in blood and not moving.

"My ears are zinging. Their ears are zinging," Wall said. "It was so forceful. It knocked us to the ground."

Competitors and race volunteers were crying as they fled the chaos. Authorities went onto the course to carry away the injured while race stragglers were rerouted away from the smoking site.

Roupen Bastajian, a 35-year-old state trooper from Smithfield, R.I., had just finished the race when they put the heat blanket wrap on him and he heard the blasts.

"I started running toward the blast. And there were people all over the floor," he said. "We started grabbing tourniquets and started tying legs. A lot of people amputated. ... At least 25 to 30 people have at least one leg missing, or an ankle missing, or two legs missing."

At Massachusetts General Hospital, said Alisdair Conn, chief of emergency services, said: "This is something I've never seen in my 25 years here ... this amount of carnage in the civilian population. This is what we expect from war."

The Boston Marathon honored the victims of the Newtown, Conn., shooting with a special mile marker in Monday's race.

Boston Athletic Association president Joanne Flaminio previously said there was "special significance" to the fact that the race is 26.2 miles long and 26 people died at Sandy Hook Elementary school.

PREVIOUS STORY:

President Barack Obama, responding to the explosions at the Boston Marathon, says the United States does not know "who did this or why" but vowed that whoever is responsible "will feel the full weight of justice."

He said: "We will find out who did this and we will hold them accountable."

Obama made his remarks Monday evening from the White House about three hours after two explosions detonated near the marathon's finish line. At least two people were killed and 50 injured in the blasts.

Obama has been in touch with federal law enforcement and Massachusetts officials in the aftermath of the explosions.

The Secret Service reacted cautiously to the blasts, expanding the security perimeter around the White House.

(Copyright 2013 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


Two bombs exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Monday, killing two people and injuring at least 23 others in a terrifying scene of broken glass, smoke and severed limbs, authorities said.

A third blast rocked the John F. Kennedy Library several miles away and more than an hour later, but no injuries were reported, police said. A senior U.S. intelligence official said two other explosive devices were found near the marathon finish line.

There was no immediate word on the motive or who may have launched the attack and authorities in Washington said there was no immediate claim of responsibility. Some 27,000 runners took part in the 26.2-mile race, one of the world's premier marathons.

The twin blasts at the race took place almost simultaneously and about 100 yards apart, tearing limbs off numerous people, knocking spectators and at least one runner off their feet, shattering windows and sending smoke rising over the street.

As people wailed in agony, bloody spectators were carried to a medical tent that had been set up to care for fatigued runners.

Cellphone service was shut down in the Boston area to prevent any possible remote detonations of explosives, a law enforcement official said. The official was speaking on condition of anonymity because the investigation was ongoing.

Boston Police Commissioner Edward Davis asked people to stay indoors or go back to their hotel rooms and avoid crowds as bomb squads checked parcels and bags left along the race route.

The Federal Aviation Administration barred low-flying aircraft from within 3.5 miles of the site.

"There are people who are really, really bloody," said Laura McLean, a runner from Toronto, who was in the medical tent being treated for dehydration when she was pulled out to make room for victims of the explosions. "They were pulling them into the medical tent."

About two hours after the winners crossed the line, there was a loud explosion on the north side of Boylston Street, just before the photo bridge that marks the finish line. Another explosion could be heard a few seconds later.

The Boston Marathon said that bombs caused the two explosions and that organizers were working with authorities to determine what happened. The Boston Police Department said two people were killed and 23 others injured. At least eight of the wounded were in critical condition, according to hospitals.

A senior U.S. intelligence official said the two other explosive devices found nearby were being dismantled. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the findings publicly.

A third explosion was heard about an hour after the first two after authorities warned spectators to expect a loud noise from a water cannon that police apparently were using to destroy one of the devices.

Competitors and race volunteers were crying as they fled the chaos. Authorities went onto the course to carry away the injured while race stragglers were rerouted away from the smoking site.

Roupen Bastajian, a 35-year-old state trooper from Smithfield, R.I., had just finished the race when they put the heat blanket wrap on him and he heard the first blast.

"I started running toward the blast. And there were people all over the floor," he said. "We started grabbing tourniquets and started tying legs. A lot of people amputated. ... At least 25 to 30 people have at least one leg missing, or an ankle missing, or two legs missing."

A Boston police officer was wheeled from the course with a leg injury that was bleeding.

"There are a lot of people down," said one man, whose bib No. 17528 identified him as Frank Deruyter of North Carolina. He was not injured, but marathon workers were carrying one woman, who did not appear to be a runner, to the medical area as blood gushed from her leg.

Smoke rose from the blasts, fluttering through the national flags lining the route of the world's oldest and most prestigious marathon. TV helicopter footage showed blood staining the pavement in the popular shopping and tourist area known as the Back Bay.

Cherie Falgoust was waiting for her husband, who was running the race.

"I was expecting my husband any minute," she said. "I don't know what this building is ... it just blew. Just a big bomb, a loud boom, and then glass everywhere. Something hit my head. I don't know what it was. I just ducked."

Runners who had not finished the race were diverted straight down Commonwealth Avenue and into a family meeting area, according to an emergency plan that had been in place.

President Barack Obama was briefed on the explosions by Homeland Security adviser Lisa Monaco. Obama also told Mayor Tom Menino and Gov. Deval Patrick that his administration would provide whatever support was needed, the White House said.


A law enforcement official says cellphone service has been shut down in the Boston area to prevent any potential remote detonations of explosives.

Authorities have not identified what caused the explosives that erupted at the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

The phone number in Boston for family members to call is 617-635-4500.


Two bombs exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon on Monday, killing two people, injuring dozens others and sending authorities rushing to aid wounded spectators. A senior U.S. intelligence official said two other explosive devices were found nearby.

One runner, a Rhode Island state trooper, said the blasts tore limbs off dozens of people. As smoke rose over the glass-strewn street, bloody spectators were carried to the medical tent that had been set up to care for fatigued runners.

There was no immediate word on the motive or who may have launched the attack. Some 27,000 runners took part in the 26.2-mile race, one of the world's premier marathons.

"There are people who are really, really bloody," said Laura McLean, a runner from Toronto, who was in the medical tent being treated for dehydration when she was pulled out to make room for victims of the explosions. "They were pulling them into the medical tent."

About two hours after the winners crossed the line, there was a loud explosion on the north side of Boylston Street, just before the photo bridge that marks the finish line. Another explosion could be heard a few seconds later.

The Boston Marathon said that bombs caused the two explosions and that organizers were working with authorities to determine what happened. The Boston Police Department said two people were killed and 23 others injured. Reports indicate as many as 28 people were hurt.

A senior U.S. intelligence official said the two other explosive devices found nearby were being dismantled. The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the findings publicly.

A third explosion was heard about an hour after the first two after authorities warned spectators to expect a loud noise from a water cannon that police apparently were using to destroy one of the devices.

Competitors and race volunteers were crying as they fled the chaos. Authorities went onto the course to carry away the injured while race stragglers were rerouted away from the smoking site.

Roupen Bastajian, a 35-year-old state trooper from Smithfield, R.I., had just finished the race when they put the heat blanket wrap on him and he heard the first blast.

"I started running toward the blast. And there were people all over the floor," he said. "We started grabbing tourniquets and started tying legs. A lot of people amputated. ... At least 25 to 30 people have at least one leg missing, or an ankle missing, or two legs missing."

A Boston police officer was wheeled from the course with a leg injury that was bleeding.

"There are a lot of people down," said one man, whose bib No. 17528 identified him as Frank Deruyter of North Carolina. He was not injured, but marathon workers were carrying one woman, who did not appear to be a runner, to the medical area as blood gushed from her leg.

Smoke rose from the blasts, fluttering through the national flags lining the route of the world's oldest and most prestigious marathon. TV helicopter footage showed blood staining the pavement in the popular shopping and tourist area known as the Back Bay.

Cherie Falgoust was waiting for her husband, who was running the race.

"I was expecting my husband any minute," she said. "I don't know what this building is ... it just blew. Just a big bomb, a loud boom, and then glass everywhere. Something hit my head. I don't know what it was. I just ducked."

Runners who had not finished the race were diverted straight down Commonwealth Avenue and into a family meeting area, according to an emergency plan that had been in place


Boston police say two people were killed and dozens hurt when a pair of bombs exploded near the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

The blasts shattered the end of the race Monday, sending authorities out on the course to carry away the injured while stragglers in the 26.2-mile race were rerouted away from the smoking site.

A senior U.S. intelligence official says two more explosive devices have been found near the scene.

The official said the new devices were being dismantled.

It was not immediately clear what kind of devices had been found Monday. The official said the first two did appear to be bombs.

The official spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the findings publicly.

The official said it was not clear what the motive was or who may have launched the attack.


Previous Story

Two explosions at the finish line of the Boston Marathon have resulted in injuries.

Bloody spectators were being carried Monday to the medical tent that had been set up to care for fatigued runners. Police wove through competitors as they ran back toward the course.

"There are a lot of people down," said one man, whose bib No. 17528 identified him as Frank Deruyter of North Carolina. He was not injured, but marathon workers were carrying one woman, who did not appear to be a runner, to the medical area as blood gushed from her leg. A Boston police officer was wheeled from the course with a leg injury that was bleeding.

There were several runners from Eastern Carolina who took part in the marathon today. One of those was D.H. Conley High School Assistant Track Coach Charlie "Choo" Justice. On his Facebook page, Justice says he is okay.

About three hours after the winners crossed the line, there was a loud explosion on the north side of Boylston Street, just before the photo bridge that marks the finish line. Another explosion could be heard a few seconds later.

(Copyright 2013 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)


Comments are posted from viewers like you and do not always reflect the views of this station.
powered by Disqus
WITN

275 E. Arlington Blvd. Greenville, NC 27858 252-439-7777
Gray Television, Inc. - Copyright © 2002-2014 - Designed by Gray Digital Media - Powered by Clickability 203068861 - witn.com/a?a=203068861