Sales Tax Holiday Underway In North Carolina

The sales tax holiday in North Carolina is underway.

The holiday began at 12:01 a.m. Friday and lasts until 11:59 p.m. Sunday.

Clothing, footwear, and school supplies of $100 or less per item; school instructional materials of $300 or less per item; sports and recreation equipment of $50 or less per item, computers of $3,500 or less per item; and computer supplies of $250 or less per item will be exempt from sales tax.

The state Legislature created tax-free days to help consumers with back-to-school shopping.


Here is a complete list of what is exempt:

LIST OF ITEMS EXEMPT DURING THE SALES TAX HOLIDAY

G.S. 105-164.13C authorizes a sales tax holiday in North Carolina. Sales and use taxes do not apply to the following items of tangible personal property that are sold between 12:01 A.M. on the first Friday of August and 11:59 P.M. the following Sunday:

1. Clothing with a sales price of one hundred dollars ($100.00) or less per item.

“Clothing” is defined as all human wearing apparel suitable for general use including coats, jackets, hats, hosiery, scarves, and shoes. The items listed below are included in the term and are therefore exempt from tax during the sales tax holiday period if the sales price of the item is $100 or less. This list is not all-inclusive.

  • Aprons, household and shop
  • Athletic supporters
  • Baby receiving blankets
  • Bandannas
  • Bathing suits and caps; beach capes and coats
  • Belts and suspenders
  • Boots; overshoes
  • Coats, jackets, capes, and wraps
  • Costumes (does not include costume masks sold separately)
  • Diapers (children and adults, including disposables)
  • Earmuffs; gloves and mittens for general use; hats and caps; hosiery; scarves
  • Formal wear (does not include rentals)
  • Garters and garter belts; girdles; leotards and tights; panty hose; socks; stockings and footlets; underwear
  • Insoles for shoes
  • Jogging suits
  • Lab coats
  • Neckties
  • Rainwear
  • Rubber pants
  • Sandals; shoes and shoelaces; slippers; sneakers; steel-toed shoes
  • Uniforms (athletic and nonathletic uniforms when purchased for nonbusiness use)
  • Wedding apparel (does not include rentals)

2. Sport or recreational equipment with a sales price of fifty dollars ($50.00) or less per item.

“Sport or recreational equipment” is defined as items designed for human use and worn in conjunction with an athletic or recreational activity that are not suitable for general use. The itemslisted below are included in the term and are therefore exempt from tax during the holiday period if the sales price of the item is $50 or less. This list is not all-inclusive.

  • Ballet and tap shoes
  • Cleated or spiked athletic shoes
  • Gloves (baseball, bowling, boxing, hockey, golf, and other sports)
  • Goggles
  • Hand and elbow guards
  • Helmets (bicycle, skating, baseball, and other sports)
  • Life preservers and vests
  • Mouth guards
  • Roller and ice skates
  • Shin guards
  • Shoulder pads
  • Ski boots
  • Waders, wetsuits, and fins

3. Computers with a sales price of three thousand five hundred dollars ($3,500) or less per item.

A “computer” is an electronic device that accepts information in digital or similar form and manipulates it for a result based on a sequence of instructions. For purposes of the exemption during the sales tax holiday, a computer includes a central processing unit, monitor, keyboard, mouse, and speakers since these items are deemed to be necessary in the operation of the computer. The separate sale of a monitor, keyboard, mouse, or speakers is subject to the applicable tax when the item is not sold in conjunction with a central processing unit. Peripherals are not considered part of a computer and are subject to the applicable tax notwithstanding that they may be sold with the computer as a package. Peripherals must be separately stated on the invoice and the appropriate tax charged on those items.

4. Computer supplies with a sales price of two hundred fifty dollars ($250.00) or less per item.

A “computer supply” is an item commonly used by a student in a course of study in which a computer is used. The items listed below are included in the term and are therefore exempt from tax during the holiday period if the sales price of the item is $250 or less. This list is all-inclusive.

  • Computer storage media, including diskettes and compact disks
  • Handheld electronic schedulers, except devices that are cellular phones
  • Personal digital assistants, except devices that are cellular phones
  • Computer printers
  • Printer supplies for computers, including printer paper and printer ink

5. School supplies with a sales price of one hundred dollars ($100.00) or less per item.

A “school supply” is an item commonly used by a student in a course of study; the term includes school art supplies and school instructional materials. The items listed below are included in the term and are therefore exempt from tax during the holiday period if the sales price of the item is $100 or less. This list is all-inclusive.

  • Binders
  • Blackboard chalk
  • Book bags
  • Calculators
  • Cellophane tape
  • Clay and glazes
  • Compasses
  • Composition books
  • Crayons
  • Erasers
  • Folders (expandable, pocket, plastic, and manila)
  • Glue, paste, and paste sticks
  • Highlighters
  • Index card boxes
  • Index cards
  • Legal pads
  • Lunch boxes
  • Markers
  • Notebooks
  • Paintbrushes for artwork
  • Paints (acrylic, tempora, and oil)
  • Paper (loose leaf ruled notebook paper, copy paper, graph paper, tracing paper, manila paper, colored paper, poster board, and construction paper)
  • Pencil boxes and other school supply boxes
  • Pencil sharpeners
  • Pencils
  • Pens
  • Protractors
  • Rulers
  • Scissors
  • Sketch and drawing pads
  • Watercolors
  • Writing tablets

6. School instructional materials with a sales price of three hundred dollars ($300.00) or less per item.

“School instructional material” is written material commonly used by a student in a course of study as a reference and to learn the subject being taught. The term is mutually exclusive of the terms “school supply” and “computer supply.” The items listed below are included in the term and are
therefore exempt from tax during the holiday period if the sales price of the item is $300 or less per item. (Prior to the 2008 holiday, these items were categorized as “school supplies” and were exempt during the holiday period if the sales price of the item was $100 or less per item.) This list
is all-inclusive.

  • Reference books
  • Reference maps and globes
  • Textbooks
  • Workbooks


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Read Comments

Comments are posted from viewers like you and do not always reflect the views of this station.
  • by Bill Location: Jacksinville on Aug 10, 2009 at 08:41 AM
    I love reading peoples comments with taxes and more taxes. All we do is tell each other our problems. But when was the last time you complain to your Senator,Governor or your Congressman or women? Stop complaining to each other and call them or e-mail them.To express your feeling. And don't say it won't help. "We the People" Does that meant anything?
  • by lena Location: windsor on Aug 8, 2009 at 10:18 AM
    I would rather have the sales tax. What is it six or seven cents? The reason is that many school supply prices have been raised over 25 cents. I pack of paper was 0.50 plus tax, this weekend, it is .75 without tax. You do the math! Families are still being taken advantage of.
  • by Educated and Satisfied Location: Eastern NC on Aug 7, 2009 at 06:35 PM
    To "To mother of college graduate in nc": I graduated from high school. I went to a well-known university (not ECU). I now live in eastern NC. I did not drink beer or party the six years I was in college while earning my bachelor's and master's degrees. Guess what? I am a public, high school teacher here in eastern NC. I chose not to associate with alcoholics, and I had plenty of friends. I have a life ...
  • by southern man Location: greenville on Aug 7, 2009 at 04:30 PM
    If we would go to a flat tax and everyone paid the same percent of there income so that the single people and couples with no kids wouldn't have to pay for your kids to go to school you wouldn't need this so called tax brake.people with kids are like people on walfare they don't pay there share and cry the most.no one asked you to live beyond what you can aford. I woukd bet your the same ones who keep voting these morones in who keep raising our taxes . LOWER TAXES PEOPLE SEND MORE MONEY SO THERE"S MORE TAX DOLLARS FOR THEM TO THROW AWAY.
  • by 3rd grade teacher Location: Martin Co. on Aug 7, 2009 at 12:17 PM
    The supplies needed for most 2nd and third graders tend to be about the same from teacher to teacher. There may be a few variations. The list for EJH is at Walmart. It is a general list and there may be a few things that your child's teacher may request that are not on the list. Here's a quick list of supplies that might be needed: crayons, pencils, pencil case, wide ruled notebook paper, 3 ring binder, a couple of one subject notebooks (wide ruled), a ruler, scissors, glue stick, red and blue ink pens. Hope this helps a little.
  • by Momma Location: Greenville on Aug 7, 2009 at 11:33 AM
    The school supply list for Pitt County has been out all summer, so you just have to get it. On the Pitt County Website, it was easy. I went today to the dollar store and bought all of the supplies listed and spent $25 even, no tax. I also got all of the clothes and shoes needed and saved myself $10 in tax. Better than not saving anything.
  • by MrT Location: LaNC on Aug 7, 2009 at 10:22 AM
    It never ceases to amaze me that a lot of college students( who you would presume to be some of the most intelligent people around)can go out and drink so much knowing the harm it does to their livers, the danger they pose to others, and themselves,and how they just act like complete idiots.And a lot of them have idiot parents that fund such foolishness.Just watch a couple of nights of TRU TV if you want to see for yourself.
  • by to chris Location: closer than you think on Aug 7, 2009 at 09:43 AM
    My son graduated 2nd in his class from medical school.He is a missionary doctor that travels around the world giving medical treatment to people in countries such as Africa,India,Asia and Bulgaria.I want to think he didn't party in college seeing as though he graduated 2 years earlier than expected. He also has a Masters in religion,so he stays pretty busy.This isn't a joke...I have a life.
  • by Julie Location: Charlotte on Aug 7, 2009 at 08:29 AM
    I saved quite a bit this year by looking for many of the basics (like backpacks and clothing) on the web. Most online retailers mark down their already low prices pretty dramatically on this stuff. To cut down on costs this year, I made a list of the back-to-school items I needed for my family and am using a free shopping service called ZingSale.com to let me know when any of them go on sale.
  • by To mother of college graduate Location: nc on Aug 7, 2009 at 08:16 AM
    If your graduate didn't drink beer and party in college they were one of the VERY few. It was a joke, get a life....
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