10 Student Teams Develop Strategy For State's Graduation Rate

Ten student teams from across North Carolina are working to develop innovative ways to increase the state's high school graduation rate, and there's a cash prize in it for the teams that come up with the best idea.

Out of 70 teams, the Institute for Emerging Issues recognized five high school and five college teams for using their creativity in helping friends and classmates earn their high school diplomas. A panel of state leaders in education, government and business picked the winners.

The projects developed several tactics to increase graduation rates, including incorporating technology into the classroom at an early age, reducing the stigmas around remedial classes, digital storytelling and freshmen mentoring programs.

The two winning teams will be announced on Feb. 7. The winning teams will each receive $5,000.


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Comments are posted from viewers like you and do not always reflect the views of this station.
  • by pass on Dec 11, 2011 at 05:12 AM
    Give illegal aliens and inner city youths + 15 on their tests. This way they will have a 70 average then get a scholarship to college just for passing!
  • by pass on Dec 11, 2011 at 05:11 AM
    Give illegal aliens and inner city youths + 15 on their tests. This way they will have a 70 average then get a scholarship to college just for passing!
  • by N/A Location: G`ville on Dec 10, 2011 at 06:55 PM
    The first thing all schools need to grade on a ten point scale, not a seven... 92= A... 76= C... 69= D!
  • by Alpha Location: Lenoir County on Dec 10, 2011 at 05:00 PM
    From what i have observed the drop out rate occurs because of Middle School. Solve the problem there and you solve the drop out problem
    • reply
      by Middle School on Dec 10, 2011 at 08:33 PM in reply to Alpha
      It is actually earlier than middle school. As a former elementary and ms principal I predicted with a high percentage which third and fourth graders that would drop out.
  • by Strategy? Location: Jacksonville on Dec 10, 2011 at 09:08 AM
    This is a great example of the private sector seeking solutions. However, wouldn't it make sense to have some teams or members of teams that are not in college or high school? If we are trying to increase the graduation rate, it might be good to include the input of students who have dropped out. My guess is that some of these kids could come up with a pretty good plan that might address why they dropped out.
    • reply
      by Anonymous on Dec 10, 2011 at 12:15 PM in reply to Strategy?
      or better yet, why not ask the actual teachers who are teaching in high-poverty schools?
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