International Focus On Mandela Memorial

By: Associated Press
By: Associated Press

President Barack Obama says Nelson Mandela earned his place in history through struggle, shrewdness, persistence and faith.

Obama is eulogizing the former South African president at a memorial service in Johannesburg. He's comparing Mandela to Mahatma Gandhi, Martin Luther King Jr. and Abraham Lincoln.

Obama is urging the world to act on Mandela's legacy by fighting inequality, poverty and racism. He says progress in the U.S. and South Africa mustn't cloud the fact there's still work to be done. He says South Africa shows us that we can change.

Obama calls Mandela the last great liberator of the 20th century, and says he thinks about how to apply Mandela's lessons to himself as a man and as president.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)


PREVIOUS STORY:

World leaders and joyous, singing South Africans have gathered to honor Nelson Mandela at a Soweto soccer stadium.

A cold, driving rain has kept many people away, and the 95,000 seat stadium has been about two-thirds full so far.

The ceremony began about an hour late, and while the mood was celebratory, the crowds twice booed scandal-plagued South African President Jacob Zuma, who is to give the keynote address.

A dazzling mix of royalty, statesmen and celebrities is in attendance, with the list running from Afghan President Hamid Karzai to Zimbabwe's Robert Mugabe.

Former South African president Thabo Mbeki, who succeeded Mandela, got a rousing cheer as he entered the stands, while United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon waved and bowed to spectators.

One black student in the crowd said Mandela's 27 years in prison had brought him freedom. Another man, who said he grew up in a "privileged position" as a white South African, credited Mandela with helping release whites from a burden of guilt through the country's reconciliation process.


PREVIOUS STORY:

President Barack Obama is opening a day of remembrance and celebration for his personal hero Nelson Mandela, arriving in South Africa for a memorial service honoring the anti-apartheid icon who died last week at age 95.

Air Force One touched down at a military base near Johannesburg on a rainy Tuesday morning. First lady Michelle Obama, former President George W. Bush and his wife, Laura, and former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton joined Obama on the 16-hour flight from Washington. Former Presidents Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter were also scheduled to attend the memorial service, but traveled to South Africa separately.

Obama will be among the speakers at Tuesday's memorial, joining tens of thousands of South Africans and dozens of dignitaries at the outdoor stadium in Johannesburg.

(Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)


Comments are posted from viewers like you and do not always reflect the views of this station.
powered by Disqus
WITN

275 E. Arlington Blvd. Greenville, NC 27858 252-439-7777
Gray Television, Inc. - Copyright © 2002-2014 - Designed by Gray Digital Media - Powered by Clickability 235187311 - witn.com/a?a=235187311