Hanna Loses Tropical Characteristics As It Moves Through New England

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UPDATE: At 8 am all coastal tropical storm warnings are discontinued.

The center of Tropical Storm Hanna was located near latitude 42.6 north...longitude 70.0 west or about 60 miles...100 km...north of Chatham Massachusetts and about 350 miles ...560 km...west-southwest of Halifax Nova Scotia.

Hanna is moving toward the northeast near 36 mph...57 km/hr...and this motion is expected to continue for the next 24 hours. Maximum sustained winds are near 50 mph...85 km/hr...with higher gusts.

Little change in strength is forecast during the next 24 hours. Hanna is expected to produce additional rainfall accumulations of 1 to 2 inches across central to southern maine early sunday morning...with the rainfall ending across maine by around sunrise.

PREVIOUS UPDATE: At 5 am all coastal tropical storm warnings are discontinued.

The center of Tropical Storm Hanna was located near latitude 42.6 north...longitude 70.0 west or about 60 miles...100 km...north of Chatham Massachusetts and about 350 miles ...560 km...west-southwest of Halifax Nova Scotia.

Hanna is moving toward the northeast near 36 mph...57 km/hr...and this motion is expected to continue for the next 24 hours. Maximum sustained winds are near 50 mph...85 km/hr...with higher gusts.

Little change in strength is forecast during the next 24 hours. Hanna is expected to produce additional rainfall accumulations of 1 to 2 inches across central to southern maine early sunday morning...with the rainfall ending across maine by around sunrise.

Previous Story:

At 11 PM EDT...Tropical Storm Hanna continues to race off to the northeast and is located about 100 miles south of Long Island.

Maximum sustained winds are near 50 mph..with higher gusts. The central pressure is 992 mb.

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Hanna entered North Carolina after 3:00 Saturday morning, and she departed the state by noon.

At 11 a.m., the tropical storm still had winds of 50 miles per hour was located at 36.6 North and 77.4 West. She was moving to the north-northeast at 24 miles per hour.

Hanna caused power outages, flooding, storm surge, ocean overwash and knocked down trees.

No major damage or inuries have been reported in Eastern Carolina. See individual stories on homepage for county reports, power outage updates and additional information.

Click here to check out photos of Hanna's impact in Eastern Carolina and submit your own.



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Tropical Storm Hanna made landfall about 3:20 a.m. on the border of South and North Carolina. The storm is now sweeping across central and eastern North Carolina, with heavy winds, rains, storm surge, flash flooding and threat of tornadoes.

At 8 a.m., Hanna's winds were 50 miles per hour. She is moving north-northeast at 22 miles per hour.

All of Eastern Carolina is under a tornado watch. There is also a high wind warning.

Flash flood warnings are in effect for Wayne, Wilson, Edgecombe, Nash and Halifax counties until 10:45 a.m.

Click here to head to WITN's Hurricane Center and track Hanna and other action in the tropics.

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At 11:00 pm Tropical Storm Hanna is hours from landfall near the South Carolina and North Carolina border area...probably as a tropical storm.

Hanna is located at 32.4N and 79.1 W or 140 miles S-SW of Wilmington, NC. Maximum sustained winds remain at 70 mph...with higher gusts. Minimum central pressure is 978 millibars...with movement to the north at 21 mph.

Hanna is moving toward the north near 20 mph. This motion is expected to continue during the next several hours with a gradual turn to the northeast and an increase in forward speed on Saturday.

On the forecast track the center of Hanna should be moving across eastern North Carolina early Saturday and then move along the mid-atlantic coast later Saturday and Saturday night.

Maximum sustained winds are near 70 mph with higher gusts. Although no significant change in strength is forecast before landfall It would only take a small increase in wind speed for hanna to become a hurricane.

Weakening is expected after landfall and Hanna should become an extratropical storm by early Sunday.

Coastal storm surge flooding of 3 to 5 feet above normal tide levels along with large and dangerous battering waves can be expected near and to the east of the path of the center of Hanna.

Hanna is expected to produce rainfall accumulations of 3 to 7 inches from coastal South Carolina northward through central and eastern North Carolina into the mid-atlantic states with isolated maximum amounts of 10 inches possible.

Isolated tornadoes are possible over the coastal plains of South and North Carolina through Saturday morning.

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8 p.m. Update:

Tropical Storm Hanna continues its track toward the Carolina coastline.

At 8:00 pm the center of Hanna was located at 31.6 N and 79.3 W or about 200 miles SSW of Wilmington and moving north near 20 miles per hour.

The storm is expected to turn toward the northeast and move quicker on Saturday.

Hanna's winds are near 70 miles per hour, and forecasters say while no significant change in strength is expected before landfall, it will take just a small increase for this storm to become a hurricane.



2 p.m. Update

At 2 PM the center of Tropical Storm Hanna is located at 29.8 N and 78.5 W or 310 miles south of Wilmington, NC. Hanna has maximum sustained winds of 70 mph...with movement to the north at 20 mph.

Hanna could be a minimal Category 1 hurricane as it makes landfall early Saturday morning along the Carolina coast.

A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for the entire coastline...with tropical storm force conditions expected within 12 hours.


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At 11 a.m Friday, Hanna remains a tropical storm, with maximum sustained winds near 65 miles per hour. The National Hurricane Center says only slight strengthening is forecast before landfall, though it is still possible for Hanna to become a hurricane.

The storm is now moving 20 miles per hour, but her speed may increase as she approaches. Hanna is 427 miles SSW of Atlantic Beach. She is expected to make landfall very early Saturday morning along the North Carolina South Carolina Border.

The tropical storm warning is in effect for all of coastal Carolina including the Pamlico and Albemarle sounds. A tropical storm warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected within the warning area within the next 24 hours.

A hurricane watch is in effect from north of Edisto Beach, South Carolina to Currituck Beach Light, including Pamlico sound.

A high wind watch is in effect for Halifax, Nash, Edgecombe, Johnston, Wilson, Harnett, Wayne, Cumberland and Sampson counties through Saturday morning.


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At 8 a.m Friday, Hanna remains a tropical storm, with maximum sustained winds near 65 miles per hour. The National Hurricane Center says only slight strengthening is forecast before landfall, though it is still possible for Hanna to become a hurricane.

Hanna slowed slightly since the last update. The storm is now moving 18 miles per hour, but her speed may increase as she approaches. Hanna is 425 miles from Wilmington. That is also where she is expected to make landfall very early Saturday morning.

The tropical storm warning is in effect for all of coastal Carolina including the Pamlico and Albemarle sounds. A tropical storm warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected within the warning area within the next 24 hours.

A hurricane watch is in effect from north of Edisto Beach, South Carolina to Currituck Beach Light, including Pamlico sound.

A high wind watch is in effect for Halifax, Nash, Edgecombe, Johnston, Wilson, Harnett, Wayne, Cumberland and Sampson counties through Saturday morning.

Click here to head to WITN's Hurricane Center and track Hanna and other action in the tropics.



PREVIOUS STORY: At 5 a.m Friday, Hanna remains a tropical storm, with maximum sustained winds near 65 miles per hour. The National Hurricane Center says only slight strengthening is forecast before landfall, though it is still possible for Hanna to become a hurricane.

Hanna is picking up speed en route to the North Carolina coast. The storm is now moving 20 miles per hour, and her speed may increase as she approaches. Hanna is 430 miles from Wilmington. That is also where she is expected to make landfall very early Saturday morning.

The tropical storm warning is in effect for all of coastal Carolina including the Pamlico and Albemarle sounds. A tropical storm warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected within the warning area within the next 24 hours.

A hurricane watch is in effect from north of Edisto Beach, South Carolina to Currituck Beach Light, including Pamlico sound.

A high wind watch is in effect for Halifax, Nash, Edgecombe, Johnston, Wilson, Harnett, Wayne, Cumberland and Sampson counties through Saturday morning.



PREVIOUS STORY: At 2 a.m. Friday, Hanna remains a tropical storm, with maximum sustained winds near 65 miles per hour. The National Hurricane Center says only slight strengthening is forecast before landfall, though it is still possible for Hanna to become a hurricane.

Tropical Storm Hanna's speed has increased; she is moving northwest near 18 miles per hour. Hanna is 490 miles south of Wilmington.

The tropical storm warning is in effect for all of coastal Carolina including the Pamlico and Albemarle sounds. A tropical storm warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected within the warning area within the next 24 hours.

A hurricane watch is in effect from north of Edisto Beach, South Carolina to Currituck Beach Light, including Pamlico sound.



PREVIOUS STORY:As of 11:00 p.m. a tropical storm warning is in effect for all of coastal Carolina including the Pamlico and Albemarle sounds. A tropical storm warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected within the warning area within the next 24 hours.

A hurricane watch is in effect from north of Edisto Beach, South Carolina to Currituck Beach Light, including Pamlico sound.

The center of Tropical Storm Hanna was estimated located near latitude 26.5 north...longitude 76.3 west moving toward the northwest near 14 mph. This motion is expected to continue during the next day or so with a gradual increase in forward speed. A turn to the north is expected by late Friday.

On the forecast track the center of Hanna will pass just east of the northwestern Bahamas tonight and will be near the southeast coast of the United States by late Friday. However, rains and winds associated with Hanna will reach the coast well in advance of the center.

Maximum sustained winds are near 65 mph with higher gusts. Only slight strengthening is forecast prior to landfall, although it is still possible for Hanna to become a hurricane.

Hanna could produce rainfall totals of 2 to 3 inches over the northern Bahamas and the eastern portions of South and North Carolina with maximum isolated amounts of 5 inches possible.

Coastal storm surge flooding of 2 to 4 feet above normal tide levels, along with large and dangerous battering waves, can be expected near and to the east of the path of the center of Hanna.



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The Eastern Carolina coast from the Oregon Inlet south is now under a hurricane watch.

The 5 p.m. advisory from the National Hurricane Center on Tropical Storm Hanna has the storm with winds at 65 miles per hour.

The storm has weakened because of dry air penetrating the center. Pressure is 989 mb.

The center is now evident, but the convection is not wrapped around it, because of southerly shear.

Forecasters believe Hanna could be a strong tropical storm with 70-mile-per hour winds when it hits North Carolina.

While Hanna is not expected to be a hurricane, forecasters say they will leave the hurricane watch up along the North Carolina coast.

The storm is moving northwest at 14 miles per hour.



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The Eastern Carolina coast from the Oregon Inlet south is now a hurricane watch.

The 11 a.m. advisory from the National Hurricane Center on Tropical Storm Hanna has the storm with winds at 65 miles per hour.

The storm has weakened because of dry air penetrating the center. Pressure is 989 mb.

The center is now evident, but the convection is not wrapped around it, because of southerly shear.

Forecasters still think Hanna could become a hurricane before making landfall.

Hanna expect the storm to make a landfall on the South-North Carolina border.

The storm is moving northwest at 12 miles per hour.

Click here to head to WITN's Hurricane Center and track Hanna and other action in the tropics.



PREVIOUS STORY: A hurricane watch is now in effect for Surf City, NC to Edisto Beach, SC. The National Hurricane Center issued that in the 5 a.m. advisory Thursday. A tropical storm watch is in effect from Edisto Beach, SC to Altamaha Sound, GA.

Hanna is about 770 miles away from Wilmington, moving northeast at 12 miles per hour.

Maximum sustained winds have increased to near 70 miles per hour. Hanna would be classified a hurricane if winds reach 74 miles per hour.

The National Hurricane Center says "slight strengthening" is possible in the next couple of days; Hanna could be a hurricane before reaching the southeast coast.

The new forecast track shows Hanna coming ashore near Wilmington.



PREVIOUS STORY: Tropical Storm Hanna could regain hurricane strength by Friday. That's according to forecasters with the National Hurricane Center in the 2 a.m. advisory Thursday.

Hanna is moving northwest at 13 miles per hour. The storm's maximum sustained winds are 65 miles per hour. A storm must have sustained winds of 74 miles per hour to become a hurricane.

Hanna continues to churn up dangerous rip currents on the coast of North Carolina and other southeastern states.



PREVIOUS STORY: As of 11:00 p.m., Tropical Storm Hanna is moving north-northwest at 13 miles per hour.

Maximum sustained winds have increased to 65 mph. The storm is expected to strengthen into a hurricane. Pressure as of 11 p.m. Wednesday is 989 mb.

It is expected to make landfall late Friday into Saturday, most likely along the North Carolina coast. Eastern Carolina could start feeling Hanna's outer rain bands and winds on Friday.

Hanna has caused at least 26 deaths in Haiti, where it has caused catastrophic flooding.



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As of 5:00 pm: Tropical Storm Hanna continues its journey north. It is currently moving to the North at 12 mph and will continue to move to the NNW over the next 48 hours.

Gradually it will increase its northern progress and could potentially become a category 1 hurricane. Its current sustained winds are 60 mph and is located at 21.9N 71.9W.

It is 940 miles S of Atlantic Beach North Carolina. It is expected to make landfall late Friday into Saturday somewhere along the South Carolina-North Carolina border.

Click here to head to WITN's Hurricane Center and track Hanna, Gustav and other action in the tropics.

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As of 2:00 pm: Tropical Storm Hanna continues its journey north. It is currently moving to the North at 10 mph and will continue to move to the NNW over the next 48 hours. Gradually it will increase its northern progress and could potentially become a category 1 hurricane. Its current sustained winds are 60 mph and is located at 21.4N 72.0W. It is 1000 miles S of Atlantic Beach North Carolina. It is expected to make landfall late Friday into Saturday somewhere along the South Carolina border.

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During the 8 a.m. National Hurricane Center described Tropical Storm Hanna's motion as "erratic."

Maximum sustained winds were 60 miles per hour. The National Hurricane Center does not expect strengthening Wednesday; Hanna could get more intense Thursday.

Click here to see how your county is preparing for the Hanna threat.



PREVIOUS STORY: Tropical Storm Hanna has weakened, according to the latest update from The National Hurricane Center.

At 5 a.m. Wednesday, forecasters said Hanna's winds were 60 miles per hour.

Hanna was slowly drifting north at a snail's pace--just 2 miles per hour.

Forecasters are targeting Hanna to come ashore as a category 1 hurricane along the central South Carolina coastline on Friday night.

Meanwhile, flooding from Tropical Storm Hanna has sent Haitian families scrambling onto rooftops. Hanna has claimed at least 21 lives in Haiti. Three storms have hit Haiti in the last two weeks, killing more than 100 people.



PREVIOUS STORY: Tropical Storm Hanna has winds of 65 miles per hour as of the 11 p.m. advisory.

The storm is nearly stationary. It is expected to take a northwestward turn early Wednesday.

Forecasters say until Hanna begins a more definitive motion, it is difficult to narrow the potential impact area.

The anticipated angle of approach to the southeast U.S. coast means only a slight deviation left or right of the track will have large implications on both time and location of the landfall.

The center of the current track has Hanna making landfall at the Georgia-South Carolina border Friday at 8 p.m. A north to northeast track is expected after that, but as noted, Hanna will need to make a move before the track becomes more clear.

The Dominican Republic has issued a tropical storm warning for its northern coast. The tropical storm warning for Haiti has been extended and is now in effect for its north border with the Dominican Republic.

A hurricane warning remains in effect for the central Bahamas, the southeastern Bahamas and the Turks and Caicos Islands.



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As of 2 PM EDT...Tropical Storm Hanna still has maximum sustained winds of 70 mph. She is located at 20.6 N 72.9 W. Hanna has been nearly stationary...and is now drifting to the southeast. A gradual turn to the west then northwest is anticipated in the next 12 to 24 hours.

Minimum central pressure with Hanna is 985 millibars.



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Florida Governor Charlie Crist has issued a state of emergency as Tropical Storm Hanna looms.

Hanna is the third storm to threaten Florida in three weeks, and the fourth hurricane of the season.

It was forecast to move into the southeastern and central Bahamas Tuesday and Wednesday.

Hanna was a hurricane Monday, but had weakened back to a tropical storm Tuesday.

Crist says Florida should be ready for flash floods and winds up to 111 mph.

However, there is no certainty Hanna will hit Florida. Current forecasts show it could also make landfall in coastal Georgia, the Carolinas or
elsewhere.

The emergency declaration allows the state to more easily mobilize employees, law enforcement personnel and other resources.

Meteorologist says people from Florida to North Carolina should be keeping a close watch on this storm.



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Hanna has been downgraded to a tropical storm with winds sustained at 70 miles per hour, but Hanna is expected to grow into a hurricane once again as she comes up the southeast coast.

Little overall motion is expected over the next day or so. A northwestward motion toward the central Bahamas is expected to begin by Wednesday.

Hurricane warnings have been issued for the Bahamas, Turks and Caicos.

Hanna's latest track brings the storm ashore somewhere between Georgia and the Carolinas between Friday and Saturday.