Camp Lejeune Marines Honored With Medals For Heroism, Selfless Acts

By: April Davis
By: April Davis
Sergeant Joshua L. Moore received the Navy Cross during an awards ceremony aboard Camp Lejeune Friday. Four other Marines were awarded medals at the ceremony, to include a Bronze Star and Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medals.

Sergeant Joshua L. Moore is presented the Navy Cross from the Secretary of the Navy, the Honorable Ray Mabus, during an awards ceremony aboard Camp Lejeune, Nov. 1, 2013

Sergeant Joshua L. Moore received the Navy Cross from the Secretary of the Navy, the Honorable Ray Mabus, during an awards ceremony aboard Camp Lejeune Friday. The Navy Cross is second only to the Medal of Honor, the military's highest award.

Four other Marines were awarded medals at the ceremony, to include a Bronze Star Medal with combat distinguishing device, and Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medals with combat distinguishing devices, for their valor and selfless acts at the same ceremony.

Moore, 25, from Franklinville, N.C., received the naval service's highest award for his extraordinary heroism while serving as a scout with scout sniper platoon, 2nd Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Team 1, in support of Operation Enduring Freedom, March 14, 2011.

Sergeant Justin L. Tygart of Orlando, Fla., received the Bronze Star Medal with Combat "V" device, and Sgt. Ritchie Elias of Anaheim, Calif., and Cpl. Gaven Eier of Charleston, S.C., were awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal with Combat "V" device. Sergeant Matthew D. Adams of Hampstead, N.C., was also awarded the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation Medal with Combat "V" device, but was unable to attend the ceremony.

While in a hide-site northeast of Marjah, all of the shooter-observer teams with Moore's section were compromised and had to return to a nearby compound they previously occupied. The section came under attack again after only a few hours in the compound.

Moore noticed the second grenade was corroded and knew it wouldn't explode, so he dropped after hearing the explosion of the first grenade.

Under heavy machine gun fire, taking several casualties and with no positive identification of the enemy forces to the north, Moore left the compound to aid the wounded and provide security.

With the arrival of the quick reaction force and another sniper section, the Marines successfully suppressed the enemy forces, evacuated the wounded and returned to the patrol base.


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