Schools Look At Social Network Policies For Teachers

Social networking sites are an increasingly popular way for people to communicate and stay in touch. And that includes teachers and students.

But one school district says teachers can no longer befriend students on such sites, out of concern of possible inappropriate comments or content.

That policy in Pender County has other schools systems examining their social networking policies.

Though other schools have not yet followed suit, some have looked into it, like Carteret County Schools. They are planning to look closer at their policies.

Carteret and Onslow County Schools say they would not be surprised if the North Carolina School Board Association would recommend the same thing for all schools that is now in effect in Pender County.


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  • by coolchange Location: Kinston on Aug 20, 2010 at 08:01 PM
    To Donna Location: Midway Park on Aug 18, 2010 at 08:48 PM "However, one would like to think that a teacher would use great discression in his or her postings, knowing the risk of his or her professional reputation. " Sort of like teachers wouldn't have inappropriate sexual relations with students because they know they would get in trouble for it, right? See, the problem is that even though folks know something is wrong, some seem drawn to do it anyway. Watch the news sometime, or read a newspaper. Happens everyday....
  • by coolchange Location: Kinston on Aug 20, 2010 at 07:54 PM
    I personally am not paying a teacher to be my daughter's friend on facebook or myspace. I am paying a teacher to prepare my daughter for the future. I don't want to see that one of her teachers is her "friend" on facebook. I think it's inappropriate. If the school system won't do anything about it proactively, then I will handle it with the principal and the school board if necessary.
  • by Anonymous on Aug 18, 2010 at 06:13 PM
    Hmmm. What ever happened to the first amendment?
  • by teacher Location: pitt on Aug 18, 2010 at 05:51 PM
    I am on FB and have many ex-students that are my friend. I DO NOT become friends with them on FB until they are older and no longer in my class. I just don't think it is worth the risk!!!
  • by Donna Location: Midway Park on Aug 18, 2010 at 05:48 PM
    I disagree with banning teachers from social networks. Comments posted on these sites are open for the public to see unless, of course, they are set as private. And then still, whoever is listed as friends can view whatever is posted. I am sure people in general do post comments and content that are inappropriate. However, one would like to think that a teacher would use great discression in his or her postings, knowing the risk of his or her professional reputation. So I guess the fact that teachers could just as easily send an email to a student with inappropriate content or comments and no one would be none the wiser because, unless you are a hacker, your cannot view someone's emails! Let's think about this!?!
  • by good grief on Aug 18, 2010 at 09:54 AM
    to Sam...'facebook' hasn't gotten anyone in trouble...it's an application...it doesn't even hold the rank of 'inanimate object' because it's not an object. people get themselves in trouble. perhaps social and social-networking etiquette needs to be taught as part of the B.S. program for teachers.
  • by To: Anonymous at 7:04 AM Location: right here on Aug 18, 2010 at 09:09 AM
    Brilliant comments --- SS. The teacher across the hall from me was fired because of things written on Facebook. If you play with fire, be prepared to get burned. Oh, I am on my scheduled lunch break from school.
  • by Sam Location: Kitty Hawk on Aug 18, 2010 at 07:53 AM
    I'm sure facebook has gotten several people in trouble with their jobs. I would'nt make it as a teacher just cause they have to put up with unruly kids that come from bad parents that think teachers are supposed to home train them.
  • by good grief on Aug 18, 2010 at 07:33 AM
    i agree with the comments of the teachers...just tell the students to not send friend requests. the school district cannot stop a teacher or a student from joining a social networking site. only a court order can do that, and that's generally reserved for sex offenders. the school district can develop and institute guidelines for all non-school-related interactions between students and teachers. btw...some teachers have kids of their own so, the schools can't tell a mom or dad that they can't friend their kid on facebook just becuase their kid happens to attend the school in which they work. that's just insane. there are other familial relationships wherein teachers may be the aunt, uncle, step-mom, step-dad, cousin, etc of a student. no school district has any right to mettle in family communications. guidelines for social interactions for non-related teachers/students are appropriate and enforceable to an extent.
  • by common sense people! Location: Tarboro on Aug 18, 2010 at 04:34 AM
    What is happening to our constitutional rights? If teachers want to enjoy catching up with long lost friends or relatives on facebook, their chosen profession should't stop them from doing so. Instead there must be guidelines put into place, like no profanity etc...I have guidelines such as these for my workplace, but they can't stop me from being on facebook. That's just crazy...
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