SOLAR ECLIPSE: Peak reached in Eastern Carolina at 2:47 p.m.

EASTERN CAROLINA WITN) -- The first total solar eclipse to sweep the U.S. coast to coast in nearly a century has come to an end.

Here in Eastern Carolina, the eclipse reached about 91% coverage, with the maximum hitting around 2:47 p.m.

WITN provided live coverage of the eclipse, with a rooftop camera in downtown New Bern.

Totality - when the sun is completely obscured by the moon - lasted just two minutes or so in each location along the narrow corridor stretching all the way across the U.S., from Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina. It took about 90 minutes for total blockage to cross the country.


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The historic eclipse is unfolding across America and soon in Eastern Carolina!

Watch the eclipse with WITN and witn.com.

Matt Engelbrecht and Heather King are LIVE NOW to help you navigate you through the big event in our area, which is expected around 2:47 p.m.

Associated Press story:

The first total solar eclipse to sweep the U.S. coast to coast in nearly a century has begun in Oregon.

Americans across the land are watching in wonder through telescopes, cameras and protective glasses Monday as the moon blots out the sun and turns daylight into twilight.

Totality - when the sun is completely obscured by the moon - will last just two minutes or so in each location along the narrow corridor stretching all the way across the U.S. heartland to Charleston, South Carolina.

Two-hundred million people live within a day's drive of Monday's path of totality. So towns and parks along the eclipse's main drag have welcomed monumental crowds for what promises to be the most observed, studied and photographed eclipse in history.

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