UK police arrest 2nd man in London subway attack case

LONDON (AP) — London police say a second man has been arrested in connection with the London subway attack.

Police said Sunday that a 21-year-old man was arrested late Saturday night in Hounslow in west London and is being held under the Terrorism Act. He is being questioned at a south London police station but has not been charged or identified.

Two men are now in custody for possible roles in the bombing attack on a rush-hour subway train Friday morning that injured 29 people in London. An 18-year-old man was arrested Saturday in the departure area of the port of Dover, where ferries leave for France.

The two arrests indicate police and security services believe the attack at the Parsons Green station was part of a coordinated plot, not the act of a single person.

“We are still pursing numerous lines of enquiry and at a great pace,” counter-terrorism coordinator Neil Basu of the London police said late Saturday.

Britain’s terror threat level remains at “critical” — the highest level — meaning that authorities believe another attack is imminent. The official threat level is not likely to be lowered until police believe all of the plotters have been taken into custody.

Police on Saturday launched a massive armed search in the southwestern London suburb of Sunbury. Neighbors were evacuated in a rush from the area and kept away for nearly 10 hours before they were allowed to return to their homes.

The Islamic State says the attack Friday was carried out by one of its affiliated units. The improvised explosive device placed on the subway train only partially detonated, limiting the number of injuries.

Home Secretary Amber Rudd said the casualties would have been far higher if the bomb had fully detonated. Frustrated by the string of terrorist attacks in recent months, she said officials will have to work harder to make bomb components more difficult to obtain.

Britain has endured four other attacks this year, which have killed a total of 36 people. The other attacks in London — near Parliament, on London Bridge and near a mosque in Finsbury Park in north London — used vehicles and knives to kill and wound.


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British police made a “significant” arrest in the urgent manhunt for suspects a day after the London subway blast that injured more than two dozen people, authorities said Saturday.

Police said that an 18-year-old man was arrested by Kent police in the port of Dover on the English Channel. He is being questioned under the Terrorism Act. Dover is a major ferry port for travel between Britain and France.

“We have made a significant arrest in our investigation this morning,” Deputy Assistant Police Commissioner Neil Basu said. But he warned that the investigation was ongoing and the terrorist threat level remains at “critical,” meaning a government task force that includes the security services believes another attack is imminent.

Basu’s comments suggested that other dangerous suspects may still be at large.

The 18-year-old suspect hasn’t been charged or identified. Police say he will be brought to a south London police station for more questioning. Police haven’t said if he is suspected of planting the bomb or if he played a supporting role in a possible plot.

Authorities had increased the terrorism threat level to “critical” late Friday, after a bomb partially exploded during the morning rush hour.

Police are combing through closed-circuit TV images and have extensively studied the remains of the device without giving details about it. But images from inside the subway car after the blast showed that the device was contained in a bucket with wires hanging out of it and that it was concealed in a plastic shopping bag.

The train hit by the bomber at Parsons Green station in southwest London had video cameras in each car, and the London Underground network has thousands of cameras at the entrances to stations and along the labyrinth of subterranean and aboveground passageways leading from the entryway to the trains.

Officials have hinted there may be more than one person involved, but haven’t released details in what is termed an ongoing and covert inquiry.

Prime Minister Theresa May said raising the threat level to its highest point was a “proportionate and sensible step.” Police called on the public to be vigilant.

The soldiers will add to the armed police presence Saturday at public places to deter attacks after the Friday morning rush-hour blast on a District Line train. No arrests have been made. The explosion and an ensuing stampede at the station injured 29 people. None of the injuries, some of them burns, were believed to be life-threatening.

The bomb went off around 8:20 a.m. Friday as the train, carrying commuters from the suburbs — including many school children — was at Parsons Green station.

The station was reopened Saturday, officials said, restoring some normalcy to London’s transport network after a day of severe disruption. There was no sign of panic among Londoners and the weekend life of the city continued undeterred by the raised threat level.

Officials said the bomb was intended to do grave harm to commuters. Analysts said the injuries would have been far worse had the entire device exploded.

“They were really lucky with this one. It could have really become much worse,” said terrorism specialist Magnus Ranstorp of the Swedish Defense University.

The Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the attack, which it said was carried out by an affiliated unit.

Britain has endured four other attacks this year, which have killed a total of 36 people. The other attacks in London — near Parliament, on London Bridge and near a mosque in Finsbury Park in north London — used vehicles and knives.

In addition, a suicide bomber struck a packed concert hall in Manchester in northern England, killing 22 people. That attack in May also briefly caused the threat level to be set at “critical.”


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British authorities say the number of people treated at hospitals after the bombing on the London Underground subway has risen to 29.

The National Health Service says 21 people are being treated and eight others have already been discharged. The London Ambulance Service says it took 19 patients to hospitals, most with minor injuries. The others went in themselves.

Police say most of those injured by an improvised explosive device on Friday suffered from flash burns. They say there have been no reports of serious life-threatening injuries.

The device burst into flames aboard a train at the Parsons Green station during the morning rush hour. London police are conducting a wide manhunt for the person or persons responsible

(Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)


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A homemade bomb exploded on a packed London subway train during rush hour on Friday, leaving 22 people injured, police and health officials said. None of the injured is thought to be seriously hurt.

Police say the explosion was a terrorist attack, the fifth in Britain this year. Britain’s domestic spy agency is helping out in the investigation.

Police were alerted to an incident at 8:20 a.m. local time (0720GMT) after commuters reported a noise and a flash aboard the District Line train at Parsons Green station in the southwest of the city. Chaos then ensued as hundreds of people rushed to get away from danger.

“I ended up squashed on the staircase, people were falling over, people fainting, crying, there were little kids clinging on to the back of me,” Ryan Barnett, 25, said of the “absolute chaos” as people tried to leave the station.

Mark Rowley, head of counterterrorism for the Metropolitan Police, said “we now assess this was a detonation of an improvised explosive device.”

He said 18 people had been injured, most with “flash burns.” Health officials later said four others took themselves to hospital.

Rowley said the domestic intelligence service, MI5, was assisting with the investigation, led by the police counter-terrorism unit.

He gave no information about potential suspects, saying “It’s very much a live investigation.” Forensic officers combed the scene for clues and detectives examined surveillance camera footage in an attempt to get a glimpse at who planted the bomb.

U.S. President Donald Trump tweeted that it was another attack “by a loser terrorist,” adding that “these are sick and demented people who were in the sights of Scotland Yard.”

The London police force declined to comment on Trump’s suggestion that it knew about the attacker.

Photos taken inside the train show a white plastic bucket inside a foil-lined shopping bag. Flames and what appear to be wires emerge from the top.

London ambulance service said they had sent multiple crews to the Parsons Green station and 18 people were hospitalized, though none had life-threatening injuries.

“There was out of the corner of my eye a massive flash of flames that went up the side of the train,” eyewitness Chris Wildish told Sky News, then “an acrid chemical smell.”

He said many of those on board were schoolchildren, who were knocked around as the crowd surged away from the fireball.

Another commuter, Richard Aylmer-Hall, said he saw several people injured, apparently trampled as they fled what he described as a packed train.

At capacity, the train could hold more than 800 people.

“I saw crying women, there was lots of shouting and screaming, there was a bit of a crush on the stairs going down to the streets,” Aylmer-Hall, said.

Aerial footage later showed commuters from other subway trains being evacuated along the elevated track.

Transport for London said subway services were suspended along the line.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the city “utterly condemns the hideous individuals who attempt to use terror to harm us and destroy our way of life.”

London has been targeted by attackers several times this year, with deadly vehicle attacks near Parliament, on London Bridge and near a mosque in Finsbury Park in north London. Beyond the capital, a May 22 suicide bomb attack at Manchester Arena killed 22 people.

The London Underground itself has been targeted several times in the past, notably in July 2005, when suicide bombers blew themselves up on three subway trains and a bus, killing 52 people and themselves. Four more bombers tried a similar attack two weeks later, but their devices failed to fully explode.

Last year Damon Smith, a student with an interest in weapons and Islamic extremism, left a knapsack filled with explosives and ball bearings on a London subway train. It failed to explode.

In its recent Inspire magazine, al-Qaida urged supporters to target trains.

Separately, French counterterrorism authorities were investigating an attempted knife attack on a soldier patrolling a large Paris subway interchange.

The Paris prosecutor’s office says counterterrorism investigators have opened a probe into Friday morning’s incident at the Chatelet station in central Paris, based on preliminary examination of the attacker’s background.

The knife-wielding assailant tried to attack a soldier with a special military force assigned to protect prominent sites following deadly Islamic extremist attacks. He was quickly arrested and no one was hurt.

(Copyright 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)


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A homemade bomb exploded on a packed London subway train during rush hour on Friday, leaving 22 people injured, police and health officials said. None of the injured is thought to be seriously hurt.

Police say the explosion was a terrorist attack, the fifth in Britain this year. Britain’s domestic spy agency is helping out in the investigation.

Police were alerted to an incident at 8:20 a.m. local time (0720GMT) after commuters reported a noise and a flash aboard the District Line train at Parsons Green station in the southwest of the city. Chaos then ensued as hundreds of people rushed to get away from danger.

“I ended up squashed on the staircase, people were falling over, people fainting, crying, there were little kids clinging on to the back of me,” Ryan Barnett, 25, said of the “absolute chaos” as people tried to leave the station.

Mark Rowley, head of counterterrorism for the Metropolitan Police, said “we now assess this was a detonation of an improvised explosive device.”

He said 18 people had been injured, most with “flash burns.” Health officials later said four others took themselves to hospital.

Rowley said the domestic intelligence service, MI5, was assisting with the investigation, led by the police counter-terrorism unit.

He gave no information about potential suspects, saying “It’s very much a live investigation.” Forensic officers combed the scene for clues and detectives examined surveillance camera footage in an attempt to get a glimpse at who planted the bomb.

U.S. President Donald Trump tweeted that it was another attack “by a loser terrorist,” adding that “these are sick and demented people who were in the sights of Scotland Yard.”

The London police force declined to comment on Trump’s suggestion that it knew about the attacker.

Photos taken inside the train show a white plastic bucket inside a foil-lined shopping bag. Flames and what appear to be wires emerge from the top.

London ambulance service said they had sent multiple crews to the Parsons Green station and 18 people were hospitalized, though none had life-threatening injuries.

“There was out of the corner of my eye a massive flash of flames that went up the side of the train,” eyewitness Chris Wildish told Sky News, then “an acrid chemical smell.”

He said many of those on board were schoolchildren, who were knocked around as the crowd surged away from the fireball.

Another commuter, Richard Aylmer-Hall, said he saw several people injured, apparently trampled as they fled what he described as a packed train.

At capacity, the train could hold more than 800 people.

“I saw crying women, there was lots of shouting and screaming, there was a bit of a crush on the stairs going down to the streets,” Aylmer-Hall, said.

Aerial footage later showed commuters from other subway trains being evacuated along the elevated track.

Transport for London said subway services were suspended along the line.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan said the city “utterly condemns the hideous individuals who attempt to use terror to harm us and destroy our way of life.”

London has been targeted by attackers several times this year, with deadly vehicle attacks near Parliament, on London Bridge and near a mosque in Finsbury Park in north London. Beyond the capital, a May 22 suicide bomb attack at Manchester Arena killed 22 people.

The London Underground itself has been targeted several times in the past, notably in July 2005, when suicide bombers blew themselves up on three subway trains and a bus, killing 52 people and themselves. Four more bombers tried a similar attack two weeks later, but their devices failed to fully explode.

Last year Damon Smith, a student with an interest in weapons and Islamic extremism, left a knapsack filled with explosives and ball bearings on a London subway train. It failed to explode.

In its recent Inspire magazine, al-Qaida urged supporters to target trains.

Separately, French counterterrorism authorities were investigating an attempted knife attack on a soldier patrolling a large Paris subway interchange.

The Paris prosecutor’s office says counterterrorism investigators have opened a probe into Friday morning’s incident at the Chatelet station in central Paris, based on preliminary examination of the attacker’s background.

The knife-wielding assailant tried to attack a soldier with a special military force assigned to protect prominent sites following deadly Islamic extremist attacks. He was quickly arrested and no one was hurt.

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Gregory Katz in London and Lori Hinnant in Paris contributed to this report.