Three more arrests made in Durham Confederate statue destruction

DURHAM, NC (WITN) - Three more people have been charged with Monday night's destruction of a Confederate statue outside the old Durham County Courthouse.

Two of those arrests came after a court hearing for the woman who says she climbed a ladder to help bring down the statue.

Dante Strobino, 35, and Ngoc Tran, 24, were both charged with felony participation in a riot with property damage in excess of $1,500, felony inciting others to riot where there is property damage in excess of $1,500, misdemeanor disorderly conduct by injury to a statue, and misdemeanor damage to real property.

Peter Gilbert, 39, was arrested later in the day on the same charges. All three are from Durham, according to a county news release.

Tayiyah Thompson was charged with the same offenses Tuesday afternoon following a news conference at North Carolina Central University.

Deputies say they are executing search warrants and say additional arrests are expected.

Toppling of the statue came during a protest in response to a white nationalist rally held in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend.


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The woman who says she climbed a ladder to help bring down a Confederate statue outside the old Durham County Courthouse was taken into custody this afternoon.

Takiyah Thompson, 22, was arrested just after protestors finished a news conference at North Carolina Central University.

Thompson told media outlets that she was a member of the Workers World Party.

She is charged with felony participation in a riot with property damage in excess of $1,500, felony inciting others to riot where there is property damage in excess of $1,500, misdemeanor disorderly conduct by injury to a statue, and misdemeanor damage to real property.

Sheriff Mike Andrews earlier told reporters that those responsible would face felony charges.

Andrews said racism does not have a place in the country nor Durham and is calling city and county leaders to "establish guidelines and safe spaces for protesters to prevent demonstrations from becoming disruptive and as we witnessed in Charlottesville, dangerous."

He defended deputies using restraint during the protest. "If I had my deputies to engage a hostile crowd, there would have been injuries," said the sheriff.

The Durham protest was in response to a white nationalist rally held in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend. Authorities say one woman was killed Saturday after one of the white nationalists drove his car into a group of peaceful counter-protesters.


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Durham County Sheriff Mike Andrews says several people involved in last night's destruction of a Confederate statue have been identified and they will pursue felony charges against them.

Activists in brought a ladder up to the statue and used a rope to pull down the Confederate Soldiers Monument that was dedicated in 1924. A diverse crowd of dozens cheered as the statue of a soldier holding a rifle fell to the ground in front of an old courthouse building that now houses local government offices.

Sheriff Andrews says investigators plan to use video captured at the scene to help identify those responsible for the removal and vandalism of the statue.

Andrews said racism does not have a place in the country nor Durham and is calling city and county leaders to "establish guidelines and safe spaces for protesters to prevent demonstrations from becoming disruptive and as we witnessed in Charlottesville, dangerous."

He defended deputies using restraint during the protest. "If I had my deputies to engage a hostile crowd, there would have been injuries," said the sheriff.

The Durham protest was in response to a white nationalist rally held in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend. Authorities say one woman was killed Saturday after one of the white nationalists drove his car into a group of peaceful counter-protesters.


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Protesters gathered in Durham Monday in response to the violence in Charlottesville over the weekend and proceeded to topple a Confederate monument.

The protest started around 6 p.m. near the old courthouse, closing part of East Main Street.

Several men used a ladder to reach the top of statue, which had been sprayed with cooking spray by authorities so it would be more difficult to climb. The statue was then pulled down with a rope.

Protesters were kicking the statue and chanting after it fell.

The statue was dedicated in 1924.