Stacia Strong

WITN News at Noon Anchor and New Bern Newsroom Chief

Connect With Me

stacia.strong@witn.com

Stacia Strong joined the WITN team in February 2015.

Alma Mater: University of Central Florida
Previous Station: KKCO
Fav TV Show: Big Bang theory, chasing life
Fav Bands: I love all kinds of music
Fav Books: gone girl, the fault in our Stars
Fav Food: French fries
Fav Beverage: I'm hopelessly addicted to Dr. Pepper
Day off: get out and explore North Carolina and anything on the water
Fav Season: summer
Fun Fact: I was on the rowing team in college
If I was stuck on an island: sun tan lotion


BIOGRAPHY:

Stacia Strong joined the WITN team in February 2015.

She came to WITN from KKCO, a WITN Gray sister station in Grand Junction, Colorado.

Stacia gained additional experience in journalism at school and as an intern for WKMG Local 6 news and News Talk WDBO in Orlando, Florida.

She graduated college in December 2013, from the University of Central Florida, with a degree in Radio and Television and minor in Sociology.

She's originally from Florida.


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